Symposia

Symposium 1:
Recent Trends in Electroanalysis and Low-Cost Electrochemical Sensors (details)

Symposium 2:
Sensors and Biosensors for Biomedical and Environmental Applications (details)

Symposium 3:
Fuel Cells, Biofuel Cells and Electrolyzers (details)

Symposium 4:
Renewable Energy and Photo-Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 5:
Gold and Related Noble Metals in Electroanalysis, Electrocatalysis, and Electrochemical Devices (details)

Symposium 6:
Advances in Bioelectrochemistry (details)

Symposium 7:
Novel Energy Storage Materials and Devices: Batteries for Powering Tomorrow’s World (details)

Symposium 8:
Sustainable Resources, Processes and Design of High Power Supercapacitors (details)

Symposium 9:
Electro-physical Chemistry and Application of Platinum Group Metals (details)

Symposium 10:
New Concepts and Opportunities in Electrochemical Synthesis: Fundamentals, Methods and Applications (details)

Symposium 11:
The Science, Technology and Engineering of Corrosion (details)

Symposium 12:
The ectrochemical Technology for Water and the Environment for Social, Health and Economic Development (details)

Symposium 13:
Electrografting of Materials: from Fundamentals to Applications (details)

Symposium 14:
Molecular Electrochemistry: from Fundamentals to Applications (details)

Symposium 15:
Computational Electrochemistry and Simulation: from Prediction of Properties to Optimization of Devices (details)

Symposium 16:
Spectroscopy, Microscopy and Theory for the Rational Design of Electrochemical Interfaces (details)

Symposium 17:
Electrochemical Technologies for Sustainable and Advanced Manufacturing (details)

Symposium 18:
Electrochemistry and Mining: Minerals and Metal Processing (details)

Symposium 19:
Imaging Heterogeneous Electrochemical Processes: From Single Molecules and
Nanoparticles to Vesicles and Cells
(details)

Symposium 20:
Carbon – A Starring Role in Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 21:
General Session (details)


Symposium 1
Recent Trends in Electroanalysis and Low-Cost Electrochemical Sensors

Sponsored by: Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

New research in analytical electrochemistry is driven by the quest for better understanding and more effective measurement of the world around us. Recent developments are aimed at lower detection limits, faster analyses, lower cost, automated and more portable systems. To achieve this, much effort is centered on the elaboration of electrodes with enhanced sensitivity, improved selectivity and greater stability. Research continues on new strategies for monitoring and quantifying emergent analytes of biological or environmental importance. Recent developments in the field are related, but not limited, to lab-on-a-chip devices and single-use sensors, paper-based electrodes, wearable or smartphone-based electrochemical (bio) sensors. This symposium will highlight recent advances in all of these areas.

Symposium Organizers
Alain Walcarius (Coordinator), Nancy University (alain.walcarius@univ-lorraine.fr)
Pedro Estrela, University of Bath
Emmanuel Iwuoha, University of Western Cape
Ritu Kataky, University of Durham

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Symposium 2
Sensors and Biosensors for Biomedical and Environmental Applications

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

Disease profiling and its early detection, is a huge priority within the Southern African and African continent. Tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, malaria, waterborne diseases, as well as cancer are among the leading health conditions that continue to impact on population health and economics of many African countries. In addition, the environmental monitoring of aquatic system is of especial interest in this region. Early and reliable diagnosis is thus of strategic interest. Diverse analytical strategies, often coupled to electrochemical characterization and quantification, are employed in many analytical laboratories. Increasingly, point-of-care systems have become a core focus to meet these challenges.

The themes that this joint symposium addresses cover the following:
• Electroanalytical sensors for nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates, small molecules, but also bacteria or viruses
• Biosensors for therapeutic monitoring of drug metabolism linked to real-time profiling of patients’ responses to drugs in order to avoid toxicity or ineffective treatment.
• Electrochemical devices and techniques for immunosensing
• Electrochemical cytometry
• Ecofriendly power sources for miniaturized electrochemical sensors
• Cost-effective microfluidic plans for biosensing and environmental analysis
• Analytical tools and methods for food, livestock, public hygiene
• Other biosensors and electroanalytical devices for environmental analysis of the analytes that are not limited to the list above

Symposium Organizers
Taek Dong Chung (Coordinator), Seoul National University (tdchung@snu.ac.kr)
Priscilla Baker, University of the Western Cape
Ronen Fogel, Rhodes University
Anthony Guiseppi-Elie, Clemson University

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Symposium 3
Fuel Cells, Biofuel Cells and Electrolyzers

Sponsored by:
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

This symposium focuses on all types of low, middle and high temperature fuel cells including enzymatic and microbial fuel cells, as well as electrolyzers for the production of hydrogen.

This symposium includes:
• Synthesis and characterization of novel materials and new cell components for these fuel cells and water electrolysis devices for low-, medium- and high-temperature applications.
• Electrocatalysts, bioinspired and biocatalysts for oxygen reduction, hydrogen oxidation, organic redox system, other fuels and oxidants usable by biocatalysts, oxygen evolution, and hydrogen evolution.
• Ion conductive membrane, separator and ionomers for fuel cells and biofuel cells, water electrolysis systems, and CO2/water co-electrolysis systems, especially synthesis and characterization of polymeric, ceramic, ionic liquid and nanocomposite systems.
• Understanding of electrochemical and chemical reactions for the degradation of materials and components of these fuel cells and electrolyzers in low-, middle- and high-temperature applications.
• Operando (in situ) observation for phenomena in these fuel cells and electrolyzers, theoretical studies and computational modeling of functional materials and cell components.

Symposium Organizers
Kiyoshi Kanamura (Coordinator), Tokyo Metropolitan University (kanamura@tmu.ac.jp)
Marian Chatenet, LEPMI
Pieter Levecque, University of Cape Town
Elisabeth Lojou, CNRS, BIP
Peter Strasser, Technische Universitaet Berlin
Hiroyuki Uchida, University of Yamanashi

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Symposium 4
Renewable Energy and Photo-Electrochemistry

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Materials electrochemistry plays a critical role in harnessing and storing solar energy as well as in solar device fabrication and application. This symposium is focused on the various aspects of photo-electrochemical energy conversion, from fundamental concepts and materials design and synthesis to solar devices and integration. Studies on thin film semiconducting materials, including bandgap engineering using various doped binary and ternary oxides or sulfides for improved optical absorption properties, and fast charge-transport are primary focus areas of this symposium. The symposium aims to bring together scientists from different areas working on different aspects of such photo-induced electrochemical systems or on basic investigations clarifying the influence of light on electrochemical reactions.

The scope of the symposium includes:
• Photovoltaics
• Dye-sensitized solar cells
• Photo-bio-inspired mechanisms and biomimetic approaches,
• Perovskite solar cells
• Photo-electrocatalysis and photo-water-splitting
• Semiconductors and thin film solar cell
• Photobioelectrodes
• Photoelectrochemical fuel production (hydrogen, methanol, formiate)
• Triggering electrochemical conversions by light
• Plasmonic electrochemistry Photoelectrochemical sensing.

Symposium Organizers
Federico Rosei (Coordinator), INRS, EMT (rosei@emt.inrs.ca)
Baodan Liu, IMR, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Csaba Janaky, University of Szeged
Frank Marken, University of Bath
Malik Maaza, iThemba LABS, UNISA
Mmantsae Diale, University of Pretoria

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Symposium 5
Gold and Related Noble Metals in Electroanalysis, Electrocatalysis, and Electrochemical Devices

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Gold is a key South African resource. Together with related noble metals Ag and Cu, it provides a ubiquitous and precious tool in electrochemistry. In fact, they can be regarded as key electrode and/or active materials (as nanoparticles and in complexes) in electrocatalysis, electroanalysis, and an increasingly wide range of advanced electrochemical devices. The Symposium will collate related studies, often of interdisciplinary character and applicative interest, dealing with topics including, but not limited to the:
• investigations of the features of Au, Ag and Cu as electrode surfaces and of their specific interactions with electroactive molecules, with related applications in molecular electrocatalysis and electroanalysis;
• applications in electroanalysis, as electrodes, or as components of composite materials (including nanoparticles) for electrochemical sensors;
• applications in spectroelectrochemistry and electroluminescence (e.g. SERS)
• applications as active materials in other electrochemical devices

Symposium Organizers
Patrizia Mussini (Coordinator), Università degli Studi di Milano (patrizia.mussini@unimi.it)
Munkombwe Muchindu, Mintek
Francesco Paolucci, University of Bologna
Jessie Pillay, NMISA
Alain Walcarius, Nancy University

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Symposium 6
Advances in Bioelectrochemistry

Sponsored by:
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

The goal of this symposium is to present and discuss important and exciting new trends in bioelectrochemistry – both fundamentals and applications. Theoretical and experimental approaches in the study of mechanisms and kinetics of electrode processes of proteins and nucleic acids are invited, including long-range electron transfer reactions in biological systems and their technological applications. Bioelectrode design will be the focus as well as methods used to characterize the electrode surfaces with molecular resolution. Applications of bioelectrochemistry including bio-electrocatalysis, bioelectroanalysis and bioelectronics will be emphasized. Novel applications of bioelectrochemistry in medicine and environmental protection are invited.

Topics include but are not limited to:
• Electron transfer in biological systems
• Electrode reactions of redox proteins/enzymes
• Modification of interfaces with biological structures and biomimetics
• Electrochemical transport through membrane and its mimics
• Enzyme, biomembrane, organelle, and whole cell bioelectrochemistry
• Photosynthesis and electrochemistry
• Electrochemistry of nucleic acids

Symposium Organizers
Seiya Tsujimura (Coordinator), University of Tsukuba (seiya@ims.tsukuba.ac.jp)
Renata Bilewicz
, University of Warsaw
Rachel Fanelwa Ajayi, University of the Western Cape
Elena Ferapontova, Aarhus University
Justus Masa, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum

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Symposium 7
Batteries for Powering Tomorrow’s World

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

The next generation of advanced rechargeable batteries will continue to rely on the maturing Li-ion chemistry, possibly with the integration of alloying, conversion and conversion-alloying anode materials. Innovative doping and coating of active electrode materials are expected to enhance safety, power and energy performance. Post Li-ion systems - such as Li-S, Li-NCM, Na-ion, etc. - are expected to enter the market, however, in the foreseeable future. Irrespective of the technology, the development of a detailed understanding of the fundamental properties of battery materials and the interactions of these materials with their environment will be the key to further improvements in the energy density, safety, and lifetime of batteries. The electrolyte is also crucial for the improvements of these devices, especially with respect to the overall battery safety. This symposium is therefore devoted to recent progress in the fundamental science related to batteries, especially for advanced battery systems. Studies related to all other (applied) aspects of batteries, including solid-state electrolytes, are also welcome.

Symposium Organizers
Stefano Passerini (Coordinator), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (stefano.passerini@kit.edu)
Mesfin Kebede, CSIR
Robert Kostecki, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Hiten Parmar, Nelson Mandela University

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Symposium 8
Sustainable Resources, Processes and Design of High Power Supercapacitors

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

This symposium will cover all fundamental and practical aspects of electrochemical capacitor research, development and applications with a focus on the use of raw materials and precursors from industrial, agricultural and civil waste resources. Basic studies on supercapacitor new materials, interfaces and processes are welcome. Novel characterization techniques, including in situ and in operando methods, and modelling studies are considered.
The use of supercapacitors to improve the exploitation of renewable energy sources for different applications: for remote areas and grid electric quality, will be a topic.
New concepts and new devices for applications ranging from micro- to large-size energy storage, with attention to materials and system integration, will be included.

Symposium Organizers
Francesca Soavi (Coordinator), University of Bologna (francesca.soavi@unibo.it)
Daniel Belanger, Universite du Quebec a Montreal
Katlego Makgopa, Tshwane University of Technology
Ncholu Manyala, University of Pretoria

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Symposium 9
Electro-physical Chemistry and Application of Platinum Group Metals

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

Over 98% of the world’s supply of platinum group metals (PGM) comes from just three countries, South Africa, Canada and Russia, with the first dominating the western world supply of Pt. It is only fitting that this symposium should be held in Durban.
PGMs present a somewhat similar physical chemistry, but exhibit a rich coordination chemistry, leading to many available complexes. In addition, PGMs feature a wide variety of important applications, including (electro)catalysis, both homo- and heterogenous, antitumor chemistries, jewellery, high temperature technical applications, and the nuclear industry.
This symposium will cover advances in the PGM physical chemistry, molecular compounds, metals and alloys that include at least one PGM and novel synthesis methods or materials.

Contributions are welcome in, but not limited to, the following areas:
• Physical chemistry of PGMs
• Molecular compounds, complexes of PGMs and their applications
• Electro- and electroless deposition of metals and alloys including PGMs
• Alloys for jewellery and tailoring of optical and mechanical properties
• Catalysis in automotive applications
• Operation of PGMs at high temperature or under extreme conditions

Symposium Organizers
Stanko Brankovic (Coordinator), University of Houston (SRBrankovic@uh.edu)
Jessica Chamier, University of Cape Town
Angel Cuesta Ciscar, University of Aberdeen
Cobus Kriek, North-West University

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Symposium 10
New Concepts and Opportunities in Electrochemical Synthesis: Fundamentals, Methods and Applications

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

Electrochemical synthesis processes continue to provide significant scientific advances: self-limiting electrodeposition processes are now able to deposit monoatomic layers, under potential or galvanic replacement methods may form atomic to nm-scale coatings conformally on surfaces with arbitrary geometry, and super conformal chemistry succeed in filling trench and nanotubes with high aspect ratio from nm to mm scales. Anodic processes at the same time have the ability to form very thin film dielectrics as well as a wide range of metal oxide nanostructures on any refractory metal and many semiconductors. Media for implementing electrochemical processes have also multiplied: new ionic liquids continue to appear in the literature as well as in the markets, and exotic systems such as supercritical CO2 or plasmas are now utilized to grow materials that cannot be otherwise obtained. This symposium will show the current state of electrochemical synthesis engineering science and practice, novel synthetic method and new materials as well as innovative methodologies, and will hopefully suggest a way forward.

Contributions in all the areas of electrochemical synthesis are welcome, including:
• Self-limiting electrodeposition
• Various flavors of under potential co-deposition, surface-limited replacement, on surfaces or nanostructures
• Advances, successes and drawbacks in super conformal growth
• Methods to control structure and properties: voltage/current waveforms and external fields
• Electrodeposition of alloys
• Synthesis in unusual/exotic media
• Novel methods for atomic/nanoscale control of morphology and function
• De-alloying and its ability to generate tailored porous structures
• Electrochemical anodization at surfaces and generation of nanostructures
• Synthesis of metal oxides, semiconductors and compounds, including 2-D materials
• Novel applications of electrochemically synthesized materials

Symposium Organizers
Giovanni Zangari (Coordinator), University of Virginia (gz3e@virginia.edu)
Omotayo Arotiba, University of Johannesburg
Luca Magagnin, Politecnico di Milano
Nolwazi Nombona, University of Pretoria

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Symposium 11
The Science, Technology and Engineering of Corrosion

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

This symposium will cover all aspects of corrosion, from fundamental science through modeling at various length and time scales, to applications such as corrosion protection, with particular emphasis on corrosion control in industry and infrastructure. Papers dealing with corrosion and corrosion protection of water systems, chemical, mining and mineral industry will be particularly welcome.

Topics include but are not limited to:
• Corrosion mechanisms, methods, modelling and monitoring
• New environmentally friendly surface treatments for corrosion protection
• Growth and characterization of chemically/electrochemically formed surface films
• Environmental degradation of surface-modified materials
• Modelling of structure/properties/performance correlations for surface-treated materials
• In situ and ex situ characterization of surfaces: enabling deep understanding of the processes of surface treatments and corrosion at micro- and nano-resolution.
• Corrosion of steel in concrete
• Corrosion and corrosion protection of drinking water systems, mining and mineral industry, nuclear and chemical industry;
• Corrosion of archaeological and historical artefacts;
• Corrosion of biomaterials.

Symposium Organizers
Monica Santamaria (Coordinator) Università di Palermo (monica.santamaria@unipa.it)
Esther Akinlabi, University of Johannesburg
Emeka Oguzie, Federal University of Technology Owerri
Sannakaisa Virtanen, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
Vincent Vivier (Coordinator), University Pierre et Marie Curie

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Symposium 12
Electrochemical Technology for Water and the Environment for Social, Health and Economic Development

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

Water supply and recycling, and soil and natural water system protection are becoming important issues in most countries around the world. Although tools to remediate problems and the circumstances may widely differ. New concepts about the circular economy are key components to understand and support the way of thinking of developed countries, in which sustainability is becoming the key paradigm. Meanwhile, developing countries are focusing on solving the social impact of the unsolved environmental problems of their population. In particular, it is paramount to provide safe water to the population and to avoid health problems associated with polluted environments. An array of electrochemical technologies and processes can help to face both contexts, with new greener and safer technologies. Development and advances of new technological approaches, novel reactor constructions, clarification of electrochemical mechanisms, new electrode materials and mathematical modeling may strengthen this strategy. This symposium aims to be a meeting point between environmental and electrochemical technologists, together with researchers in sustainable water working in disparate regions all around the World. The symposium will also attempt to obtain consensus about best practices in implementing new electrochemical technologies to solve the most serious water supply and environmental problems that humankind has to face in the near future.

Symposium Organizers
Manuel A. Rodrigo (Coordinator), Universidad de Castilla-la-Mancha (Manuel.Rodrigo@uclm.es)
Henry Bergmann
, Anhalt University
Ioannis Ieropoulos, University of the West of England
Chi-Chang Hu, National Tsing Hua University
Heidi Richards, University of the Witwatersrand

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Symposium 13
Electrografting of Materials: from Fundamentals to Applications

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

This Symposium will cover all aspects of surface modification of materials with organic moieties by their electrochemical activation. The Symposium will cover a broad range of topics, from fundamentals to applications, including but not limited to: electrografting of organic layers on carbon-based and other highly porous materials surfaces as well as platinum group, noble and coinage metals as massive electrodes, films or nano objects, semi-conductors and polymers; mechanistic investigations; modelization / synthesis / characterization of molecular and supramolecular electrografted architectures; applications of modified surfaces (in biology, sensors, micro/nanoelectronics, plasmonics, electrochromic devices, electrochemical energy conversion and storage, amongst others). The purpose of this Symposium is thus to bring together leading scientists working on all these aspects, in order to stimulate intensive discussions and initiate collaborations in these topics within the electrochemical community.

Symposium Organizers
Olivier Buriez (Coordinator), Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (olivier.buriez@ens.fr)
Samuel Chigome, Botswana Institute for Technology Research and Innovation
Philippe Hapiot, Université de Rennes
Philani Mashazi, Rhodes University
Fetah Podvorica, University of Prishtina

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Symposium 14
Molecular Electrochemistry: from Fundamentals to Applications

Sponsored by:
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Contemporary molecular electrochemistry involves investigation of molecular transformations initiated by or involving charge transfer steps. This symposium will cover all aspects of fundamental charge transfer processes (including electrosynthetic aspects) in organic, organometallic (with special focus on the noble metal complexes), coordination, supramolecular assemblies and (conducting) polymers with particular focus on their applications (industry, medicine, material science and electronics). This symposium also includes investigations of charge transfer and charge transport phenomena at a single molecular level. Topics will comprise detailed electrochemical investigation of electron and proton transfer processes, bond activation, new approaches towards elucidation of the charge transfer and transport mechanisms between donor and acceptor, case studies of structure-reactivity relationship (steric, conformational, stereogenic-chiral, etc.), effect of the ion-pairing or host-guest interactions, multi-redox and electrocatalytic systems. Contributions developing new methodologies (advanced imaging, in situ spectroscopic and theoretical approaches) for elucidation of the underlying mechanistic principles of molecular transformations involving charge transfer steps are also welcome. The main purpose of this symposium is to bring together leading scientists working on the mechanistic issues of molecular transformations towards desired functionalities and stimulating their discussion with the rest of the electrochemical community.

Symposium Organizers
Magdaléna Hromadova (Coordinator), J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry (hromadom@jh-inst.cas.cz)
Jeanet Conradie, University of the Free State
Shankara Radhakrishnan, University of Pretoria
Guobao Xu, Chinese Academy of Sciences

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Symposium 15
Computational Electrochemistry and Simulation: from Prediction of Properties to Optimization of Devices

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

Theory and computational electrochemistry give the promise of achieving both a greater fundamental understanding or characterization of experiments and a prediction of the properties and performance of new electrochemical devices prior to experimentation. Based on the advantage of limited cost, they aim to foster the innovation like both fundamental and technology breakthroughs. This symposium aims at coupling aspects of physical electrochemistry to elements of electrochemical engineering, in particular through the use of simulation techniques in strong connection with experimental characterization for validation.

The following topics will be considered:
• Using simulation techniques such as ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo, Continuum Fluid Dynamics, multiphysics and/or multiscale computational approaches for understanding and for the optimization and design of electrochemical cells
• Design of experimental validation techniques
• Methods for determination or estimation of parameters entering the computational models
• Comparison and correlation of behaviors and properties obtained at various scales and using different computational techniques
• Applications include: charge transfer processes, electrochemical interfaces, electrocatalysis, porous electrodes, photo-electrochemical cells, electrochemical cells for energy storage and conversion (batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells, electrolyzers)

Symposium Organizers
Alejandro Franco (Coordinator), Université de Picardie Jules Verne (alejandro.franco@u-picardie.fr)
Krishna Bisetty, Durban University of Technology
Alex Quandt, University of the Witwatersrand

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Symposium 16
Spectroscopy, Microscopy and Theory for the Rational Design of Electrochemical Interfaces

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

The electrode-electrolyte interface defines the performance of diverse electrochemical devices with applications related to energy (conversion, production and storage), water (purification and remediation), (bio-)chemical sensing, environmental and process monitoring, surface protection, optical displays and electronics. Fabrication of optimized interfacial architecture and functionality for a given application requires the ability to control and determine interfacial composition and the interactions between the system components at a molecular level. Recent advances that combine electrochemical methods with in situ/ in operando spectroscopy, electrochemical scanning probe microscopy, synchrotron-based techniques and theoretical calculations provide a detailed picture of the electrochemical interface at the atomic and molecular level. These lead to an understanding of the structure-reactivity and structure-selectivity relationships that dictate electrochemical reaction mechanisms and kinetics. These are crucial to the design and exploitation of improved materials. This symposium will cover recent developments in experimental and theoretical methods for the understanding and rational design of electrode surfaces, from model electrodes to novel nanostructured electrocatalysts and functional materials.

Symposium Organizers
Shaowei Chen (Coordinator), University of California at Santa Cruz (shaowei@ucsc.edu)
Dave Billing, University of the Witwatersrand
Charl J. Jafta, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Katharina Krischer, Technische Universität München
Bin Ren, Xiamen University
Manuela Rueda, Universidad de Sevilla

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Symposium 17
Electrochemical Technologies for Sustainable and Advanced Manufacturing

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

Current chemical industrial production methods have approached their practical performance limits, therefore, new transformational, disruptive, and enabling technologies are needed that will provide solutions to the chemical industry beyond incremental manufacturing improvements.
Electrochemistry and electrochemical technologies provide the potential to develop transformational technologies to make more efficient traditional chemical and biological processes. This symposium will provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of the most recent developments on the application of electrolysis and electrochemical processes in traditional chemical processes that had enabled and/or could lead to sustainable manufacturing.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
• new electrochemical technologies for process water (treatment, reuse), materials synthesis and/or recycling
• sustainable advanced electrode materials and structures;
• life-cycle analysis demonstrating the impact of electrochemistry in sustainable manufacturing,
• advanced cell and system design, including reactant and product flow, heat transfer, and stack level materials corrosion;
• electrochemical performance and cell characterization;
• modeling and simulation of electrochemical phenomena and processes;
• applications and economic analysis;
• scale-up demonstration of novel electrochemical processes.

Symposium Organizers
Gerardine Botte (Co-ordinator), Ohio University (botte@ohio.edu)
Takayuki Homma, Waseda University
Peter Olubambi, University of Johannesburg
Herman Potgieter, University of the Witwatersrand
Dongping Zhan, Xiamen University

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Symposium 18
Electrochemistry and Mining: Minerals and Metal Processing

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

Electrochemistry underpins the separation and recovery of metals, being via high temperature electrometallurgy for smelting (e.g. molten salts for reactive metals like Al or Mg, or slags electrolysis such as in electric arc furnace or novel electrolytes) or electrowinning in aqueous media (e.g. electrowinning of Zn, Cu, or electro-refining) or electrorefining (e.g. Platinum group and precious metals). As a matter of fact all metals go through an electrochemical process in their supply chain - with the exception of iron -, enabling higher purity products and enhanced sustainability. Challenges to further mitigate the environmental impact of materials processing with electrochemistry require advanced understanding of the underlying thermochemistry, electrochemical mechanisms, and transport phenomena along with the development of novel electrolytes, electrode materials or electrochemical configurations. In this context the present symposium seeks contributions that present new results in topics encompassing:
• cathode phenomena (both high and low temperature), including role of impurities, fundamentals of metal deposition in solid and liquid state, novel process evolving gaseous or powder products;
• electrolyte transport properties and physical chemistry;
• anode: inert anode materials development, role of gas evolution on process performance, novel design;
• cell design: modeling, scale-up;
• energy efficiency: process model, trends in a given industry, new frontiers.

Symposium Organizers
Antoine Allanore (Coordinator), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (allanore@mit.edu)
Jochen Petersen, University of Cape Town
Mmalewane Modibedi, CSIR
Yasuhiro Fukunaka, Waseda University
Toru Okabe, University of Tokyo

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Symposium 19
Imaging Heterogeneous Electrochemical Processes: From Single Molecules and Nanoparticles to Vesicles and Cells

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

Most electrochemical processes are heterogeneous, thus requiring spatially resolved techniques. To address this need, various electrochemically-controlled microscopies, including scanning probe microscopies (e.g., STM, AFM, SECM, SICM) and optical microscopies (Fluorescence, Raman, dark-field, ECL and plasmonics), have been developed in recent years, allowing mapping of local electrochemical activities on electrodes with single molecule and single nanoparticle detection capability. Examples include 1) heterogeneous electrode processes (fingerprints, and electrode and bipolar electrode arrays), and 2) single molecules, nanoparticles, vesicles, and cells. This symposium will focus on how imaging tools address challenges in basic and applied electrochemistry.

Symposium Organizers
Nongjian Tao (Coordinator), Arizona State University (nongjian.tao@asu.edu)
Aziz Amine, Hassan II University of Casablanca
Ismael Diez-Perez, King’s College London
Wei Wang, Nanjing University

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Symposium 20
Carbon – A Starring Role in Electrochemistry

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

Carbon-based materials have been successfully employed as electrode materials for the last 70 years, starting from graphite, glassy carbon and carbon paste, ending at the turn of the century to fullerenes (and alike), carbon nanotubes and graphene.
Several applications benefited from carbon-based materials resulting in considerable economical/environmental impact. The symposium is aimed at addressing new perspectives in the use and application of carbon based materials in three main themes: Energy storage; Sensors and Organic/environmental applications. Emphasis will be devoted to the design of electrode materials, taking into account the modifications to the carbon-based material and its inter-relation with performance.

Symposium Organizers
Ahmed Galal (Coordinator), Cairo University (galal@sci.cu.edu.eg)
Patrick Ndungu, University of Johannesburg
Vincent Nyamori, University of KwaZulu Natal
Zikhona Tetana, University of the Witwatersrand

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Symposium 21
General Session

Sponsored by: All Divisions

This Symposium will cover all ISE areas not compatible with topical symposia.

Symposium Organizers
Bernard Tribollet (Coordinator), University Pierre et Marie Curie (bernard.tribollet@upmc.fr)
Paul Ejikeme, University of Nigeria
Chi-Chang Hu, National Tsing Hua University
Samson Khene, Rhodes University
Duduzile Nkosi, University of Johannesburg

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